Brown Rice + Herb Crackers

IMG_4933IMG_4939

These little gluten free crackers are super versatile and surprisingly easy to make.  A combination of brown rice and almond flour are flecked with sesame seeds, fresh herbs, nutritional yeast and sea salt for a cracker that can stand alone or be eaten with virtually any dip or topping.  If you can find dulse flakes at your local grocery store, throw some of those in for some added mineral content and depth of flavor.

These crackers contain more fiber, protein and healthy fat than your typical boxed crackers and deliver way more flavor.  Plus, you can add them to your repertoire of “party tricks” to impress your friends…pretty much a win, win situation in my book.

Note: I have sage, rosemary and thyme growing in my garden at virtually all times. You can substitute the same quantity of any fresh herb you choose, OR use 1/2 the amount of dried herbs if you don’t have access to fresh!

1/2 cup brown rice flour
3/4 cup almond flour
2 Tablespoons ground flax
2 Tablespoons sesame seeds 
1 Tablespoon Nutritional Yeast
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped finely 
1 teaspoon fresh sage, chopped finely 
1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, chopped finely 
1 teaspoon dulse flakes
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 cup water
1 Tablespoon olive oil

Preheat your oven to 350F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

 In a large bowl, mix together all dry ingredients. Add wet ingredients and mix well until incorporated. Knead by hand until you can easily shape the dough into a ball with little to no crumbling.

Shape the dough into a ball and place between two sheets of parchment paper.  Roll out to 1/8th of an inch thickness using a rolling pin…or a wine bottle, like I do.

Using a pizza slicer or sharp knife, slice into 1 inch squares.  This recipe also works well with cookie cutters for a little extra fun.

Bake for 16-18 minutes until golden brown.  Allow to cool and store in an airtight container, if they last that long!

Grapefruit, Fennel + Kale Juice

IMG_5643 IMG_4808

This weekend, a friend talked me into splitting a giant case of beautiful Texas grapefruit at the farmer’s market.  What to do with it all remains a mystery and I’m afraid my kitchen table might collapse from the weight of it all.  So far it has made its way into a grapefruit and fennel salad, has been broiled with honey until bubbling, and has been devoured solo.

This morning I juiced it, together with some winter greens and a little ginger, and the result was refreshing and delicious without being too sweet.  This juice is high in Vitamins A, C + K, packs digestive and detox benefits and is filled with powerful antioxidants.  When juicing, and always, organic is best.

Makes two 16 oz servings

8 stalks lacinato kale (curly kale will also work)
6 stalks celery
1 small bulb fennel, plus fronds
2-3 grapefruit, peeled
1 inch nub ginger

Run the ingredients through your juicer, alternating between high moisture content fruits and vegetables (like grapefruit and celery) and those with lower moisture content (like kale).

Garnish with a grapefruit slice. Cheers!

Simple Almond Milk

IMG_4927

This recipe works about the same for just about any nut milk you want to make, though soaking times and amounts may vary slightly.  Homemade almond milk is amazing and is super easy, and most importantly, you’ll know exactly what is in it. Nearly all store bought almond milks contain stabilizers, some of which can be potentially harmful like carrageenan.  I don’t know about you, but for something I consume just about every day, I’d rather know what I’m putting in my body!  I make a point to start some almonds soaking on Saturday night or Sunday morning so that we can have fresh almond milk for smoothies all week.  Use this stuff in smoothies, coffee, oatmeal, desserts and anywhere you’d normally use milk.

2 cups almonds or other nut, soaked 8 hours and up to overnight
5 cups filtered water
2 dates, pitted
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch sea salt
1 whole vanilla bean

Drain soaking water and rinse almonds well.  Place in a blender with the filtered water, starting on low and working your way up to the high setting for 1-2 minutes until smooth and uniform.

Strain the milk using a nut milk bag, cheesecloth or just a super fine strainer.  After straining, return the almond milk to the blender and add dates, cinnamon, sea salt and vanilla.  Blend another 1-2 minutes until thoroughly combined.

Store in the fridge for 5-7 days.

Master Tonic


IMG_5596

Master Tonic, also known as Fire Cider, is a powerful immune booster that has been around in some form or another for ages.  I recently saw a tiny bottle for sale in Brooklyn, for like, $25 or something ridiculous.  This is a recipe you can make at home from a few simple, yet potent ingredients.  It stores for ages, so make enough to get you through cold and flu season!

Onions, horseradish, ginger, garlic and hot peppers are combined with apple cider vinegar and herbs, then fermented for two weeks to create a tonic that could basically cure the plague.  All of these ingredients have known antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties and also stimulate circulation as well as detoxify the body.

A food processor or blender makes short work of this recipe, just blend the ingredients in batches.  Goggles are optional and you might want to open a window while you’re making it…or at least maybe don’t wear mascara the day you make it, especially if you’re sensitive to chopping onions.  The mason jars pictured here are a half gallon, but you can scale this to any size using equal parts of all the chopped ingredients and just enough vinegar to cover.

One part onions, diced 
One part horseradish, grated
One part ginger, minced
One part garlic, minced
One part hot peppers such as serrano or thai, minced
One bunch fresh oregano
Bragg's apple cider vinegar

Layer the first five ingredients in a mason jar. Slide sprigs of the oregano down the sides of the jar.  Pour the apple cider vinegar into the jar all the way up to the top.

Seal and store in a cool place away from direct sunlight for two weeks, turning over daily. After two weeks, strain the solids from the liquid. You may want to reserve the solids and use in salad dressings or marinades.

Drink 1-2 ounces twice daily for an immune boost, three to four times daily during times of imbalance. Cheers!


Turmeric, Ginger + Honey Tea

IMG_5511

IMG_5519

IMG_5536

I swear I was a medicine woman in a past life. Dr. Quinn, anyone? But seriously, unless I am on my death bed, and probably even then, I won’t touch over the counter meds.  The list of people who’ve experienced (and survived) one of my remedies is long, and I’m constantly conjuring up natural remedies to prevent and treat any ailment–ask anyone who knows me. Usually it’s some combination of garlic, ginger, lemon or vinegar that is almost intolerably spicy or strong, but it always does the trick. Knock on wood, I can’t remember the last time I had a cold or even a sniffle that lasted more than a day.

 This recipe does, of course, contain some of those elements. But it is also sweet, almost craveable, warming and balanced.  I made it one chilly morning this week when I woke up with possibly the worst stiff neck I’ve ever experienced, and sure enough, I was cured in less than a day. My boyfriend was nursing a cold at the time, so I threw in some extra ginger and a squeeze of lemon for his sake, and the result was one for the books.  Really good stuff, even if you’re not sick!

This tea is perfect for cold and flu season, for aches and pains and for cold winter mornings. It is sweet, spicy and invigorating. Fresh turmeric has a wealth of health benefits, and powder can absolutely be substituted if you cannot find fresh. Turmeric is anti-inflammatory, anti-tumorigenic and improves circulation.

Ginger aids in digestion and adds to the antioxidant, antibacterial and antiviral value of this tea. Local honey acts to soothe the throat and when taken regularly can help with seasonal allergies.

Black pepper helps to increase the turmeric’s bioavailability and adds a nice layer of spice. Store a jar of this in the fridge and use throughout the cold winter months, or anytime really!

Makes one 16 ounce jar of syrup

4 Tablespoons fresh turmeric, peeled and grated or very finely minced
4 Tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and grated or very finely minced
1 teaspoon black pepper, ground
1 cup raw local honey
hot water
lemon

Combine the grated turmeric and ginger with the honey. Add the black pepper and stir until uniform. Alternatively, the paste can be made in the blender, just make sure you clean the blender right away to avoid stains!

Store the paste in a mason jar in the fridge. As needed, mix 1-2 Tablespoons with 1 cup of hot water and a squeeze of lemon.

Note: Turmeric will stain anything it comes in contact with, including your fingernails, so be forewarned…or just enjoy the free bright yellow mani!